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City blog. Rome based.

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The Pyramid of Cestius

The Pyramid of Cestius was built in the 1st century BC along the Via Ostiense, as usual at that time. Despite that, it is one of the most unusual funerary monuments in Rome.

At first sight, one might believe to be in Egypt, or maybe in Las Vegas.

But it is in the center of Rome, in the Ostiense district, and with a 20-minute walk you can reach the Colosseum. Instead, the Via Ostiense takes you to Ostia, the ancient port of Rome.

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Saint Peter in chains Basilica and Michelangelo’s Moses: 5 good resons to visit it [VIDEO]

A stone’s throw away from the Colosseum, the basilica of San Pietro in Vincoli (Saint Peter in chain) tells us about historical events, breathtaking artworks and fascinating legends.

There are tons of  reasons to climb the Esquiline Hill in Rome, and visit it will not leave you disappointed.

In this post I will focus on the basilica of San Pietro in Vincoli and 5 good reasons to visit it.

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The Capitoline Hill in Rome: the greatness of a small hill [VIDEO]

History books tell us that Rome was founded on seven hills.

First Romulus created a small village on the Palatine Hill; later this village incorporated others, to form the city of Rome.

Not far from the Palatine Hill is a small hill, the smallest of the legendary seven.

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Jupiter and Ganymede: an immense passion for the ancient world

1700 was an incredibly vibrant century in Rome from the artistic point of view; crossroads of artists, intellectuals, connoisseurs and art lovers, the Eternal City was an incubator of ideas that, developing, have shaped our vision of classical aesthetics.

(another post about neoclassic art is here)

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A Van Gogh painting in the Vatican Museums

By crossing the entrance of the Vatican Museums we mostly think about art, history and religion. We think about the power of Roman sculptures and the calm of Egyptian statues. To the timeless perfection of the Renaissance frescoes by Michelangelo and Raphael.

And that’s exactly where we have to go: halfway between the rooms frescoed by Raphael for popes Julius II and Leo X and Michelangelo’s sensational Sistine Chapel. There, in the rooms frescoed at the end of the 1400s by Pinturicchio for Pope Alexander VI Borgia, we find a museum of modern art; this is the collection opened in 1973 by Pope Paul VI, one of the thirteen museums of the Vatican Museums.

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Off the beaten track: not ordinary Rome (part 1)

EDIT: I started writing this post before Italy’s lockdown due to the Coronavirus outbreak. It was originally supposed to be the second part of this post. At that time the emergency wasn’t so big, and didn’t seem to be any real danger even in Rome. The whole country was living as usual, and no alarm had yet shaken Italy and Rome. The situation quickly changed:

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